In Which I Learn to Call Myself a Jesus Feminist.

Awhile back Sarah Bessey wrote this post, In Which I am Learning to Own My Authority. It was one of those posts that echoed in my hearts for days and weeks and months afterward. It sprang up in my thoughts whenever I came face-to-face with my self-doubt, calling me toward boldness.

“I’m a woman still learning how to walk in my authority as a daughter of the King. I’m not supposed to apologize for what God has shown me or done in my life. But here I am, dulling my voice, fitting the too-small box of God-breathed womanhood, shrugging off. [...] After all this time, I still minimize the work and goodness and grace of God in my life out of fear. [...] Because I am writing about a thorny issue, and because I am nervous about how it will be received, my fear was coming across in my tone more than I realized. And that tone – apologizing, fearful, ‘hey, here’s an idea…’ – was undermining the very message and intent of my work at its very core, disproving my very thesis.”

Her words resonate so deeply because they are my experience too. Like Sarah, I’ve begun to notice the subtle, deeply engrained habit of doubting God’s work in my life and my own ability to discern it.

Even six months ago, I was not comfortable with calling myself a feminist. I’ve loved the idea of feminism, I’ve loved the idea of women’s equality, I’ve written about it here and there for years as I’ve felt empowered to do so. But I would always shrink back from it, afraid that I would become the caricature of feminism that church and secular culture depict: shrill, man-hating, hell-bent on flipping the gender-hierarchy in women’s favor and destroying the nuclear family.

If I call myself a feminist, am I working against God’s will? Is it really not His desire that all people be treated as fully human, male and female, Jew and Gentile, slave and free? 

But I’ve learned so much about feminism from people like Sarah Bessey and Rachel Held Evans and Dianna Anderson and Hila Sachar and Danielle Vermeer and Emily Maynard, who have introduced me to other voices that have changed my understanding of both feminism and my faith. And the more I’ve learned about feminism, the more I’ve learned that my longing to see men and women work together, is God at work in my life. And I had been letting the fear and sexism of my culture (Christian and secular alike) tell me that I was not capable of discerning God’s work in my own heart.

My fear and doubt and insecurity over calling myself a feminist is symptomatic of patriarchy at work in my own life. Questioning my own authority is a product of abusive power dynamics. And it occurred to me, even amidst my wavering hope in the Church, that Jesus was never the one to silence or shame people for asking questions, male or female.

My conservative, evangelical upbringing did not give me a theological framework for engaging feminism, but that didn’t mean the theological framework didn’t exist.

The door has been flung wide open to express the doubt and hurt and frustration that I had been trying to hide away for so long. And I’ve found hope and joy for what my faith, my work, my relationships and my politics could be if I just stepped into my identity as God’s daughter, as equal and capable as His sons. There is so much I still don’t understand, so much I still don’t know about living this out in my life, but I believe that even learning to voice our questions in safe community with one another is an important part of debunking the false authority of patriarchal power structures. Those power structures tell us that asking questions is a form of weakness, but it is a form of strength. I don’t need to have it all figured out in order to call myself a feminist. I don’t need to have it all figured out to call myself a Christian.

Jesus Feminism is where I’ve found my voice to articulate my faith and my feminism in a new way, to engage them together, rather than holding them at odds.

So I am my mother’s daughter : I am the daughter of strong female leadership. I am the daughter of a mother who worked a full time job, lived with breast cancer for 14 years, and was one of the first women to serve on the board of her American Baptist Church.*

I am married to a musician : I am the wife of a husband who is kind and creative in a time when our culture doesn’t value those qualities in men. I believe that patriarchal power structures hurt all of society, men and women alike, and my husband and I are working together to overcome that.

I am baptist born-and-raised : I am the child of a church that was very conservative and very evangelical, but also very loving and *willing to change when they felt God moving.

I am a millennial writer : I am a member of an “entitled” generation, who earned my degree and entered the job market in the middle of a recession, who has struggled through my fair share of cynicism toward the Church, and I am living out my calling as a writer both in my full-time job and in my creative endeavors.

And I am a Jesus Feminist. I am learning to be a feminist the way that Jesus is a feminist. Because I follow Jesus, I want to see God’s redemptive movement for women arch towards justice. And I am not afraid to say that this is how God is at work in my life.

This post is in conjunction with Sarah Bessey’s Jesus Feminist synchroblog to celebrate the launch of her book. I received my copy in the mail this weekend and I’m already loving it. Wherever you are in your beliefs about gender roles or Christianity or both, I highly recommend it.  

  • http://facebook.com/naomimariemusic Naomi Marie

    As a listener, devout follower of Jesus and as an admittedly antagonistic character, often looking for a vacation from popular perspective, I am really grateful for who you are. You are an admirably consistent writer with a strong voice that’s honest enough to trust. It sounds that way, at least.
    I used to be “sort of a” feminist…but I suppose that I used to be “sort of a” lot of things. At this juncture, I have bizarrely old fashioned convictions about womanhood, and consider myself a non-feminist. Nevertheless, I anticipate the insight you will bring in upcoming posts and look forward to understanding more of how Jesus redeems us through them!
    Cheers!

    • http://www.bethanysuckrow.com/ Bethany Suckrow

      Thanks for your kind words, Naomi.

  • emmillerwrites

    I always sort of blithely assumed I was a feminist, ever since I was little. And then I grew up and I wasn’t sure I was anymore: People kept telling me I had to believe this or that, and I didn’t, or they flat-out told me I wasn’t One of Them. But I’m getting familiar with the title again, thanks to people like Sarah Bessey, who clears room at the table for everybody, and friends like you, who can have discussions about hot-button issues like this thoughtfully. :)

  • http://www.emergingmummy.com/ Sarah Bessey

    This is so beautiful, so true. My goodness, Bethany, I loved every word and love walking alongside of you.

    • http://www.bethanysuckrow.com/ Bethany Suckrow

      Thanks so much for reading my post, Sarah. It means a lot to me. I am so deeply thankful for your leadership and grace for all of us who are learning alongside you.

  • http://www.natalietrust.com/ Natalie Trust

    Ahhhh! I love this SO MUCH.

  • http://hopefullyknown.com/ Tamara Rice

    Beautiful, as always, Bethany. Love your heart more every time I read what you write. (And, hey, that is some very good penmanship, girl!)

    • http://www.bethanysuckrow.com/ Bethany Suckrow

      Thanks!! Art is another love of mine, second only to writing. :)

  • Suzanne Terry

    I love it! Great piece.

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